Schweiz Mobil - Wanderland
Swiss Hiking Federation

Hiking trail network and signalization

Hiking trail network

The hiking trail network comprises all hiking trails, mountain trails and Alpine routes that are linked together. It is generally outside built-up areas, providing access in particular to recreational areas, scenic landscapes, and cultural sights worthy of note as well as touristic facilities. It also includes historic trail sections where possible.

To map with hiking network

Hiking trails

Hiking trails are generally accessible trails and usually determined for foot traffic. They generally lead aside from roads carrying motorized traffic and are usually not surfaced with asphalt or concrete. Steep sections are negotiated with steps and areas with the danger of falling are protected by hand rails. Streams are crossed by catwalks or bridges.
Hiking trails make no special demands upon the users.
Signalization for hiking trails is yellow.
Presentation on the SwitzerlandMobility Web map. Legend

Mountain trails

Mountain trails are hiking trails, which partly access difficult terrain. They are mostly steep, narrow and exposed in places. Particularly difficult sections are secured with ropes or chains. In certain circumstances streams can only be crossed via fords.
Users must be surefooted, have a head for heights, be physically fit and have knowledge of dangers in the mountains (rock falls, danger of slipping/falling, sudden changes in the weather). Solid boots with good sole profiles, equipment appropriate to weather conditions and topographical maps are preconditions.
Signalization of mountain trails is a yellow signpost with white-red-white tip. White-red-white painted stripes confirm the route.
Presentation on the SwitzerlandMobility Web map. Legend

Alpine routes

Alpine routes are challenging mountain trails. They sometimes lead across glaciers and scree, through rockfall areas and through rocks with short climbing sections. It can not be assumed that any structural provisions have been undertaken and these would in any case be limited to securing particularly exposed sections with a danger of falling.
Users of Alpine routes must be surefooted, have a head for heights, be physically very fit and know how to use ropes and pick axe as well as being able to negotiate climbing sections with the aid of their hands. They must have knowledge of dangers in the mountains. In addition to the equipment for mountain trails, an altimeter, compass, rope and pick axe for crossing glaciers are essential.
Signalization of Alpine routes is a blue signpost with white-blue-white tip, white-blue-white painted stripes confirm the route. The information panels at the beginning of Alpine routes indicate special requirements. SwitzerlandMobility websites do not include Alpine routes.

The signalization of SwitzerlandMobility routes

The signalization of SwitzerlandMobility routes is standard throughout Switzerland. It is based on Swiss norms for signalization of non-motorized traffic (SN 640 829). It was revised for the realization of SwitzerlandMobility and today is the only international norm for standard signalization of non-motorized traffic.
The yellow signs for hiking trails, white signs for the barrier-free routes and red for cycling, mountain biking and skating routes were supplemented for SwitzerlandMobility with the addition of route information panels including route names and numbers. One-digit numbers indicate national routes, two-digit numbers indicate regional routes and three-digit numbers indicate local routes.
The route information panels are green for hikers and barrier-free routes, light blue for cyclists, ochre for mountain bikers, violet for skaters and turquoise for canoeists. These colours are also used by SwitzerlandMobility to illustrate the various routes e.g. on maps, information signs and the Internet. Thus, light-blue lines indicate cycling routes.